LEAN MEAT EXPLAINED

The problem of saturated fats have been plaguing the mind of meat eaters for some time. Although some fats are a good source of energy and provides protection to several organs of the body, other fats typically found in meat and dairy have extremely high fat content which could be detrimental.

Lean Meat Explained
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Lean Meat comes to the rescue of those who are worried about getting the most out of their meat. Lean meat is essentially meat with fat content that is comparatively low. In addition to lean meat there is also extra lean meat which contains half the amount of normal and saturated fat present in lean meat.  This means consuming only 5gm of fat, 2gm of saturated fat, and 95 milligrams of cholesterol for every 3.5 ounce serving.

Lean Meat Explained

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A few examples of lean meat you can easily spot while shopping are turkey and chicken breasts, however with the skin removed as the skin contributes to 80% of the fat content. Most seafood can also be considered lean meat although the fat, cholesterol, or calorie content could sometimes vary from the definition of lean meat as provided by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). For example, although shrimp has high cholesterol, it is low in fat and calories.  The fat from lamb and veal can also be manually removed to get lean meat.

Lean Meat Explained

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Above all, lean meat is consumed because of its nutritional value. Lean meat is mainly a source of protein and contains less calories. It is ideal for those who are on a low fat diet. While enabling weight loss it also provides antioxidants such as selenium and vitamins B3 and B6 which ensures the conversion of carbohydrate particles into glucose in the body.

Lean Meat Explained

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Although consuming meat by itself already provides a diverse set of nutrients such as zinc, magnesium, and iron; you can still head over to Brown Apron to be greeted by a variety of lean meat options to make your everyday meat consumption two times healthier.